~On This Day In History~Date: Aug 14, 2003Event: Blackout hits Northeast United StatesOn this day in 2003, a major outage knocked out power across the eastern United States and parts of Canada. Beginning at 4:10 p.m. ET, 21 power plants shut down in just three minutes. Fifty million people were affected, including residents of New York, Cleveland and Detroit, as well as Toronto and Ottawa, Canada. Although power companies were able to resume some service in as little as two hours, power remained off in other places for more than a day. The outage stopped trains and elevators, and disrupted everything from cellular telephone service to operations at hospitals to traffic at airports. In New York City, it took more than two hours for passengers to be evacuated from stalled subway trains. Small business owners were affected when they lost expensive refrigerated stock. The loss of use of electric water pumps interrupted water service in many areas. There were even some reports of people being stranded mid-ride on amusement park roller coasters. At the New York Stock Exchange and bond market, though, trading was able to continue thanks to backup generators.Authorities soon calmed the fears of jittery Americans that terrorists may have been responsible for the blackout, but they were initially unable to determine the cause of the massive outage. American and Canadian representatives pointed figures at each other, while politicians took the opportunity to point out major flaws in the region’s outdated power grid. Finally, an investigation by a joint U.S.-Canada task force traced the problem back to an Ohio company, FirstEnergy Corporation. When the company’s EastLake plant shut down unexpectedly after overgrown trees came into contact with a power line, it triggered a series of problems that led to a chain reaction of outages. FirstEnergy was criticized for poor line maintenance, and more importantly, for failing to notice and address the problem in a timely manner—before it affected other areas.Despite concerns, there were very few reports of looting or other blackout-inspired crime. In New York City, the police department, out in full force, actually recorded about 100 fewer arrests than average. In some places, citizens even took it upon themselves to mitigate the effects of the outage, by assisting elderly neighbors or helping to direct traffic in the absence of working traffic lights.In New York City alone, the estimated cost of the blackout was more than $500 million.Source: www.History.com

~On This Day In History~

Date: Aug 14, 2003
Event: Blackout hits Northeast United States

On this day in 2003, a major outage knocked out power across the eastern United States and parts of Canada. Beginning at 4:10 p.m. ET, 21 power plants shut down in just three minutes. Fifty million people were affected, including residents of New York, Cleveland and Detroit, as well as Toronto and Ottawa, Canada. Although power companies were able to resume some service in as little as two hours, power remained off in other places for more than a day. The outage stopped trains and elevators, and disrupted everything from cellular telephone service to operations at hospitals to traffic at airports. In New York City, it took more than two hours for passengers to be evacuated from stalled subway trains. Small business owners were affected when they lost expensive refrigerated stock. The loss of use of electric water pumps interrupted water service in many areas. There were even some reports of people being stranded mid-ride on amusement park roller coasters. At the New York Stock Exchange and bond market, though, trading was able to continue thanks to backup generators.

Authorities soon calmed the fears of jittery Americans that terrorists may have been responsible for the blackout, but they were initially unable to determine the cause of the massive outage. American and Canadian representatives pointed figures at each other, while politicians took the opportunity to point out major flaws in the region’s outdated power grid. Finally, an investigation by a joint U.S.-Canada task force traced the problem back to an Ohio company, FirstEnergy Corporation. When the company’s EastLake plant shut down unexpectedly after overgrown trees came into contact with a power line, it triggered a series of problems that led to a chain reaction of outages. FirstEnergy was criticized for poor line maintenance, and more importantly, for failing to notice and address the problem in a timely manner—before it affected other areas.

Despite concerns, there were very few reports of looting or other blackout-inspired crime. In New York City, the police department, out in full force, actually recorded about 100 fewer arrests than average. In some places, citizens even took it upon themselves to mitigate the effects of the outage, by assisting elderly neighbors or helping to direct traffic in the absence of working traffic lights.

In New York City alone, the estimated cost of the blackout was more than $500 million.

Source: www.History.com

~On This Day In History~Date: Aug 13, 1961Event: Berlin is dividedShortly after midnight on this day in 1961, East German soldiers begin laying down barbed wire and bricks as a barrier between Soviet-controlled East Berlin and the democratic western section of the city.After World War II, defeated Germany was divided into Soviet, American, British and French zones of occupation. The city of Berlin, though technically part of the Soviet zone, was also split, with the Soviets taking the eastern part of the city. After a massive Allied airlift in June 1948 foiled a Soviet attempt to blockade West Berlin, the eastern section was drawn even more tightly into the Soviet fold. Over the next 12 years, cut off from its western counterpart and basically reduced to a Soviet satellite, East Germany saw between 2.5 million and 3 million of its citizens head to West Germany in search of better opportunities. By 1961, some 1,000 East Germans—including many skilled laborers, professionals and intellectuals—were leaving every day.In August, Walter Ulbricht, the Communist leader of East Germany, got the go-ahead from Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev to begin the sealing off of all access between East and West Berlin. Soldiers began the work over the night of August 12-13, laying more than 100 miles of barbed wire slightly inside the East Berlin border. The wire was soon replaced by a six-foot-high, 96-mile-long wall of concrete blocks, complete with guard towers, machine gun posts and searchlights. East German officers known as Volkspolizei (“Volpos”) patrolled the Berlin Wall day and night.Many Berlin residents on that first morning found themselves suddenly cut off from friends or family members in the other half of the city. Led by their mayor, Willi Brandt, West Berliners demonstrated against the wall, as Brandt criticized Western democracies, particularly the United States, for failing to take a stand against it. President John F. Kennedy had earlier said publicly that the United States could only really help West Berliners and West Germans, and that any kind of action on behalf of East Germans would only result in failure.The Berlin Wall was one of the most powerful and iconic symbols of the Cold War. In June 1963, Kennedy gave his famous “Ich bin ein Berliner” (“I am a Berliner”) speech in front of the Wall, celebrating the city as a symbol of freedom and democracy in its resistance to tyranny and oppression. The height of the Wall was raised to 10 feet in 1970 in an effort to stop escape attempts, which at that time came almost daily. From 1961 to 1989, a total of 5,000 East Germans escaped; many more tried and failed. High profile shootings of some would-be defectors only intensified the Western world’s hatred of the Wall.Finally, in the late 1980s, East Germany, fueled by the decline of the Soviet Union, began to implement a number of liberal reforms. On November 9, 1989, masses of East and West Germans alike gathered at the Berlin Wall and began to climb over and dismantle it. As this symbol of Cold War repression was destroyed, East and West Germany became one nation again, signing a formal treaty of unification on October 3, 1990.
Source: www.History.com

~On This Day In History~

Date: Aug 13, 1961
Event: Berlin is divided

Shortly after midnight on this day in 1961, East German soldiers begin laying down barbed wire and bricks as a barrier between Soviet-controlled East Berlin and the democratic western section of the city.

After World War II, defeated Germany was divided into Soviet, American, British and French zones of occupation. The city of Berlin, though technically part of the Soviet zone, was also split, with the Soviets taking the eastern part of the city. After a massive Allied airlift in June 1948 foiled a Soviet attempt to blockade West Berlin, the eastern section was drawn even more tightly into the Soviet fold. Over the next 12 years, cut off from its western counterpart and basically reduced to a Soviet satellite, East Germany saw between 2.5 million and 3 million of its citizens head to West Germany in search of better opportunities. By 1961, some 1,000 East Germans—including many skilled laborers, professionals and intellectuals—were leaving every day.

In August, Walter Ulbricht, the Communist leader of East Germany, got the go-ahead from Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev to begin the sealing off of all access between East and West Berlin. Soldiers began the work over the night of August 12-13, laying more than 100 miles of barbed wire slightly inside the East Berlin border. The wire was soon replaced by a six-foot-high, 96-mile-long wall of concrete blocks, complete with guard towers, machine gun posts and searchlights. East German officers known as Volkspolizei (“Volpos”) patrolled the Berlin Wall day and night.

Many Berlin residents on that first morning found themselves suddenly cut off from friends or family members in the other half of the city. Led by their mayor, Willi Brandt, West Berliners demonstrated against the wall, as Brandt criticized Western democracies, particularly the United States, for failing to take a stand against it. President John F. Kennedy had earlier said publicly that the United States could only really help West Berliners and West Germans, and that any kind of action on behalf of East Germans would only result in failure.

The Berlin Wall was one of the most powerful and iconic symbols of the Cold War. In June 1963, Kennedy gave his famous “Ich bin ein Berliner” (“I am a Berliner”) speech in front of the Wall, celebrating the city as a symbol of freedom and democracy in its resistance to tyranny and oppression. The height of the Wall was raised to 10 feet in 1970 in an effort to stop escape attempts, which at that time came almost daily. From 1961 to 1989, a total of 5,000 East Germans escaped; many more tried and failed. High profile shootings of some would-be defectors only intensified the Western world’s hatred of the Wall.

Finally, in the late 1980s, East Germany, fueled by the decline of the Soviet Union, began to implement a number of liberal reforms. On November 9, 1989, masses of East and West Germans alike gathered at the Berlin Wall and began to climb over and dismantle it. As this symbol of Cold War repression was destroyed, East and West Germany became one nation again, signing a formal treaty of unification on October 3, 1990.

Source: www.History.com

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Gas Powered Denver 50 Scooter

Price: $748 includes delivery, liftgate services, and 3 month warranty.

Plus Free MSO and Title.

Available Colors:  Black / Blue / Red

Fast and Easy Commute Solution!

http://www.atv4less.com/products/daily-deal-denver-50

Or please call

877-528-5377

~On This Day In History~Date: August 12, 1887Event: Austrian physicist Rudolf Josef Alexander Schrödinger is bornBorn in Vienna in 1887 to a factory owner and his Austrian-English wife, Schrödinger was tutored at home as a child and went on to study theoretical physics at the University of Vienna before undertaking voluntary military service, later returning to academia to study experimental physics.Renewed military service during the first world war broke up his studies before he was sent back to Vienna in 1917 to teach a course in meteorology.However, it was not until his late 30s that he was to change forever the face of physics by producing a series of papers that were all written and published over the course of a six-month period of theoretical research.By 1925, then a professor of physics at the University of Zurich and holidaying in the Alps, Schrödinger formulated a wave-equation that accurately gave the energy levels of atoms. It formed the basis of the work that would earn him the Nobel prize in physics in 1933.In subsequent years, he repeatedly criticized conventional interpretations of quantum mechanics by using the paradox of what would become known as Schrödinger’s cat. This thought experiment was designed to illustrate what he saw as the problems surrounding application of the conventional, so-called “Copenhagen interpretation” of quantum mechanics to everyday objects.Other work focused on different fields of physics, including statistical mechanics, thermodynamics and color theory. In a celebrated 1944 book, What Is Life?, he turned to the problems of genetics, taking a close look at the phenomenon of life from the point of view of physics.He died in Vienna in January 1961 from the tuberculosis that had affected him throughout his life and was buried in the western Austrian village of Alpbach.

~On This Day In History~

Date: August 12, 1887
Event: Austrian physicist Rudolf Josef Alexander Schrödinger is born

Born in Vienna in 1887 to a factory owner and his Austrian-English wife, Schrödinger was tutored at home as a child and went on to study theoretical physics at the University of Vienna before undertaking voluntary military service, later returning to academia to study experimental physics.

Renewed military service during the first world war broke up his studies before he was sent back to Vienna in 1917 to teach a course in meteorology.

However, it was not until his late 30s that he was to change forever the face of physics by producing a series of papers that were all written and published over the course of a six-month period of theoretical research.

By 1925, then a professor of physics at the University of Zurich and holidaying in the Alps, Schrödinger formulated a wave-equation that accurately gave the energy levels of atoms. It formed the basis of the work that would earn him the Nobel prize in physics in 1933.

In subsequent years, he repeatedly criticized conventional interpretations of quantum mechanics by using the paradox of what would become known as Schrödinger’s cat. This thought experiment was designed to illustrate what he saw as the problems surrounding application of the conventional, so-called “Copenhagen interpretation” of quantum mechanics to everyday objects.

Other work focused on different fields of physics, including statistical mechanics, thermodynamics and color theory. In a celebrated 1944 book, What Is Life?, he turned to the problems of genetics, taking a close look at the phenomenon of life from the point of view of physics.

He died in Vienna in January 1961 from the tuberculosis that had affected him throughout his life and was buried in the western Austrian village of Alpbach.

~Trail Spotlight~Location: Harrison, OHTrail: Doug Dunaway Memorial ParkThis park opened in 2009, and is owned and operated by the city of Harrison. There are two separate tracks.Track hours are Tuesday and Thursday 9:30am-8pmand Sunday 11am-8pm.Both bikes and atvs are permitted.Call before heading out, park may be closed temporarily during inclement weather.
 
Have Fun Stay Safe :}

~Trail Spotlight~

Location: Harrison, OH
Trail: Doug Dunaway Memorial Park

This park opened in 2009, and is owned and operated by the city of Harrison. 
There are two separate tracks.
Track hours are Tuesday and Thursday 9:30am-8pm
and Sunday 11am-8pm.
Both bikes and atvs are permitted.
Call before heading out, park may be closed temporarily during inclement weather.

 

Have Fun Stay Safe :}

~Trail Spotlight~
Location: Cottage Grove, OR
Trail: Noonday Trail
This trail was originally a wagon road used by early miners during the late 1800’s.
This Historic trail is now mostly a dirt road with a few washouts that follow Champion Creek.
The trail starts as a hill climb and levels off. This area offers beautiful views of waterfalls and Cascade Mountain Range. The trail is best accessible during late spring and fall months. Nearby Fairview Peak Lookout Site offers furnished cabins for around $50 a night. 
Have Fun & Stay Safe :}

~Trail Spotlight~

Location: Cottage Grove, OR

Trail: Noonday Trail

This trail was originally a wagon road used by early miners during the late 1800’s.

This Historic trail is now mostly a dirt road with a few washouts that follow Champion Creek.

The trail starts as a hill climb and levels off. This area offers beautiful views of waterfalls and Cascade Mountain Range. The trail is best accessible during late spring and fall months. Nearby Fairview Peak Lookout Site offers furnished cabins for around $50 a night. 

Have Fun & Stay Safe :}

~On This Day In History~
Date: June 4, 1989
Events: Tiananmen Square massacre takes place

Chinese troops storm through Tiananmen Square in the center of Beijing, killing and arresting thousands of pro-democracy protesters. The brutal Chinese government assault on the protesters shocked the West and brought denunciations and sanctions from the United States.

In May 1989, nearly a million Chinese, mostly young students, crowded into central Beijing to protest for greater democracy and call for the resignations of Chinese Communist Party leaders deemed too repressive. For nearly three weeks, the protesters kept up daily vigils, and marched and chanted. Western reporters captured much of the drama for television and newspaper audiences in the United States and Europe. On June 4, 1989, however, Chinese troops and security police stormed through Tiananmen Square, firing indiscriminately into the crowds of protesters. Turmoil ensued, as tens of thousands of the young students tried to escape the rampaging Chinese forces. Other protesters fought back, stoning the attacking troops and overturning and setting fire to military vehicles. Reporters and Western diplomats on the scene estimated that at least 300, and perhaps thousands, of the protesters had been killed and as many as 10,000 were arrested.

The savagery of the Chinese government’s attack shocked both its allies and Cold War enemies. Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev declared that he was saddened by the events in China. He said he hoped that the government would adopt his own domestic reform program and begin to democratize the Chinese political system. In the United States, editorialists and members of Congress denounced the Tiananmen Square massacre and pressed for President George Bush to punish the Chinese government. A little more than three weeks later, the U.S. Congress voted to impose economic sanctions against the People’s Republic of China in response to the brutal violation of human rights.

~On This Day In History~

  • Date: June 4, 1989

Events: Tiananmen Square massacre takes place

Chinese troops storm through Tiananmen Square in the center of Beijing, killing and arresting thousands of pro-democracy protesters. The brutal Chinese government assault on the protesters shocked the West and brought denunciations and sanctions from the United States.

In May 1989, nearly a million Chinese, mostly young students, crowded into central Beijing to protest for greater democracy and call for the resignations of Chinese Communist Party leaders deemed too repressive. For nearly three weeks, the protesters kept up daily vigils, and marched and chanted. Western reporters captured much of the drama for television and newspaper audiences in the United States and Europe. On June 4, 1989, however, Chinese troops and security police stormed through Tiananmen Square, firing indiscriminately into the crowds of protesters. Turmoil ensued, as tens of thousands of the young students tried to escape the rampaging Chinese forces. Other protesters fought back, stoning the attacking troops and overturning and setting fire to military vehicles. Reporters and Western diplomats on the scene estimated that at least 300, and perhaps thousands, of the protesters had been killed and as many as 10,000 were arrested.

The savagery of the Chinese government’s attack shocked both its allies and Cold War enemies. Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev declared that he was saddened by the events in China. He said he hoped that the government would adopt his own domestic reform program and begin to democratize the Chinese political system. In the United States, editorialists and members of Congress denounced the Tiananmen Square massacre and pressed for President George Bush to punish the Chinese government. A little more than three weeks later, the U.S. Congress voted to impose economic sanctions against the People’s Republic of China in response to the brutal violation of human rights.

~Trail Spotlight~
Location: Chattanooga , TN
Trail: Prentice Cooper State Park
This state park is located right outside Chattanooga. The area is very large and offers many miles of ATV trails. 
There are two designated campgrounds in the forest that provide direct access to the trail.
Larger trailers and RVs are advised to stage at Hunters Check Station Campground.
Always call before heading out!

Have Fun & Stay Safe! :]  

~Trail Spotlight~

Location: Chattanooga , TN

Trail: Prentice Cooper State Park

This state park is located right outside Chattanooga. The area is very large and offers many miles of ATV trails. 

There are two designated campgrounds in the forest that provide direct access to the trail.

Larger trailers and RVs are advised to stage at Hunters Check Station Campground.

Always call before heading out!

Have Fun & Stay Safe! :]  

~On This Day In History~
Date: May 29, 1979
Events: Woody Harrelson’s father is arrested for murder 
Judge John Wood, known as “Maximum John,” is assassinated outside his San Antonio, Texas, home as he bent down to look at a flat tire on his car. 
Actor Woody Harrelson’s father, Charles Harrelson, was charged with the murder after evidence revealed that drug kingpin Jimmy Chagra, whose case was about to come up before “Maximum John,” had paid him $250,000.
Chagra, worried about the sentence that was soon to be imposed by Judge Wood, apparently conspired with his wife and brother to hire Harrelson to carry out the murder. Shattered bullet fragments found at the scene were traced to a .240 Wetherby Mark V rifle—the type recently purchased by Harrelson’s wife, Jo Ann. Harrelson, who had a prior conviction for murder in 1968, was convicted and sentenced to two life sentences in prison. Jo Ann, convicted of conspiracy to obstruct justice and perjury  was later paroled. Woody Harrelson funded his father’s appeals, enlisting the aid of famed attorney Alan Dershowitz.
Charles Harrelson died on March 15, 2007, at age 69 of a heart attack in his cell at Colorado’s Supermax federal prison.
www.History.com

~On This Day In History~

Date: May 29, 1979

EventsWoody Harrelson’s father is arrested for murder 

Judge John Wood, known as “Maximum John,” is assassinated outside his San Antonio, Texas, home as he bent down to look at a flat tire on his car. 

Actor Woody Harrelson’s father, Charles Harrelson, was charged with the murder after evidence revealed that drug kingpin Jimmy Chagra, whose case was about to come up before “Maximum John,” had paid him $250,000.

Chagra, worried about the sentence that was soon to be imposed by Judge Wood, apparently conspired with his wife and brother to hire Harrelson to carry out the murder. Shattered bullet fragments found at the scene were traced to a .240 Wetherby Mark V rifle—the type recently purchased by Harrelson’s wife, Jo Ann. Harrelson, who had a prior conviction for murder in 1968, was convicted and sentenced to two life sentences in prison. Jo Ann, convicted of conspiracy to obstruct justice and perjury  was later paroled. Woody Harrelson funded his father’s appeals, enlisting the aid of famed attorney Alan Dershowitz.

Charles Harrelson died on March 15, 2007, at age 69 of a heart attack in his cell at Colorado’s Supermax federal prison.

www.History.com

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~Daily Deal~

Unit: Vegas 150

Original Price: $978.00

Daily Deal: $903.00

Today We Are Offering

Our Vegas 150

For Only $903.00!

Thats $75.00 Off The Original Price! 

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To Claim Your Offer Before The Day Is Up!

~Trail Spotlight~
Location: Cato, NY
Trail: Cato MX 

This natural track consists mostly of dark soil and winds through rolling green hills.
Open practice is held on Tuesday before a scheduled race event and on select Saturday.
It’s recommended to call before heading out!




Have Fun & Stay Safe! :]  
Source: Riderplanet

~Trail Spotlight~

Location: Cato, NY

Trail: Cato MX 

This natural track consists mostly of dark soil and winds through rolling green hills.

Open practice is held on Tuesday before a scheduled race event and on select Saturday.

It’s recommended to call before heading out!

Have Fun & Stay Safe! :]  

Source: Riderplanet

~Trail Spotlight~
Location: Solon, IA 
Trail: Lakeview OHV Park 

This park is open to ATVs, UTVs and motorcycles. 
The area offers miles of wood and sand trails. There is no fee to ride but you will need a current Iowa registration sticker.
Its required, and DNR officers regularly patrol the area.
Camping is not permitted but there is a nearby reservoir that offers camping and swimming opportunities. It also has numerous boat ramps!


Have Fun & Stay Safe! :]  

~Trail Spotlight~

Location: Solon, IA 

Trail: Lakeview OHV Park 

This park is open to ATVs, UTVs and motorcycles. 

The area offers miles of wood and sand trails. There is no fee to ride but you will need a current Iowa registration sticker.

Its required, and DNR officers regularly patrol the area.

Camping is not permitted but there is a nearby reservoir that offers camping and swimming opportunities. It also has numerous boat ramps!

Have Fun & Stay Safe! :]  

:D Go On, Check Us Out!